The Horrors of Dehumanization Essay Sample

“The Almighty himself was a butcher: it was He who decided who would populate and who would decease ; who would be tortured. and who would be rewarded” ( Wiesel. “Hope. Despair” ) . The writer of Night. a fresh documenting the atrocious and ghastly events of the holocaust. Elie Wiesel expresses his experiences and observations in which he and his fellow Jews were dehumanized while life in concentration cantonments. All Jews. as a race. were brutalized by the Nazis during this clip ; cut downing them to no less than objects. These dehumanising offenses were the penalties forced on the Judaic race by the Nazi influence. turning Judaic nationality into a nuisance against what they believed. Elie Wiesel has written the fresh Night depicting the flagitious offense of the dehumanisation of 1000000s of Jews that the Nazis perpetrated within their concentration cantonments.

An illustration of dehumanisation that Elie Wiesel provides in his novel is the deficiency of humane worth that the Nazis idea of the Judaic people. When the Hungarian constabulary barged into Sighet. “A Jew no longer had the right to maintain in his house gold. gems. or any objects of value” ( Wiesel 10 ) . The Nazis deprived the Jews of any valuables and later they forced them to sit in crowded waggons that had no infinite to travel approximately in. This proves how the Nazis idea of the Judaic people as excessively small of humane worth to be able to have any type of valuable that they could name their ain. Subsequently on. a German officer state the Jews. “‘There are 80s of you in this waggon. ’ added the German officer. ‘If anyone is losing. you’ll all be shot. like dogs… . ’” ( Wiesel 22 ) . This shows that the Germans had no regard for the Judaic people. This besides proves that they thought nil of them. Alternatively the Germans compared the Jews to being similar “dogs” or animate beings. which emphasizes that they were non capable of the good qualities a human can hold. The Nazis subsequently show how they had perfectly 0 regard for the Judaic people as they are being transported to the concentration cantonments.

The procedure of dehumanisation so continues when Eliezer. his household. and his fellow Judaic people reach Auschwitz. which was one of many concentration cantonments Hitler made in Germany. The Germans make certain to handle the Judaic people with small or no regard every bit shortly as they arrive at the cantonments. When the Jews were allow off of the waggon the first thing one SS adult male says to the group of Jews is. “Men to the left! Women to the right! ” ( Wiesel 27 ) . Here they treat the them as if they were a herd of animate beings giving bids to work forces. adult females. and kids merely to divide them from their households and loved 1s. After the separation Eliezer comes across the crematoriums. “A lorry drew up at the cavity and delivered its load-little kids. Babies! …those kids in the flames” ( Wiesel 30 ) . This dehumanized the Jews because they could smell. hear. and see their fellow Jews being burned to decease. This awful act becomes even more malicious when cognizing that most of the people that were being thrown into these flaring ditches were unclothed and were sometimes even still alive. This shows that the Germans did non hold the attention nor the regard if they had killed a full grown grownup. a immature kid. or even a babe. Nazi dainty and think of the Judaic race as nil more than mere objects or animate beings as Elie Wiesel begins to emphasis this later on in the novel.

The dehumanisation of the Jews was once more displayed later on when the Germans continue to handle the Judaic people as animate beings or objects. Wiesel provinces. “Our apparels had been left behind in the other block. and we had been promised other outfits. Toward midnight. we were told to run” ( Wiesel 38 ) . This dehumanized them because the Germans made the Jews tally in the cold dark air with no apparels on as if they were some type of immortalized inhumanly object. Later. while still running the guards tells the Jews. “The faster you run. the Oklahoman you can travel to bed” ( Wiesel 38 ) . Even though it was cold the guards made the Jews work for the apparels they had wear and for the bunks they had sleep in. They deprived them of any type of human right as if they weren’t human plenty to hold these rights. Another illustration of dehumanisation is when Eliezer becomes “A-7713” . Wiesel says. “The three ‘veterans. ’ with acerate leafs in their custodies. engraved a figure on our left weaponries. I became A-7713. After that I had no other name” ( Wiesel 39 ) . This shows the dehumanisation of Eliezer because now he is referred to as a figure in a line instead than himself. No 1 now will of all time cognize him by name- Eliezer -but for a figure for the following twosome of old ages he will pass in the concentration cantonment. Nazis wanted to minimize the Judaic people and do them experience as if they had no right of any humanely rubric and treated them as objects or possibly even as animate beings.

The Germans flagitious offenses against the Jews caused the Judaic people to turn against one another. dehumanising each other and even themselves. Another portion of dehumanisation used in Wiesel’s novel is how the Jews attitude towards each other began to alter as they move from one cantonment to another cantonment at the terminal of World War II. The undermentioned explains the beginning of Eliezer’s dehumanisation. “I did non travel. What had happened to me? My male parent had merely been struck. before my really eyes. and I had non flicked an eyelid” ( Wiesel 37 ) . This quotation mark shows that Eliezer has lost his regard for his male parent because he did non seek and halt the itinerant from aching him. This dehumanizes him because it shows how he could merely sit and watch his male parent be beaten right in forepart of his eyes without experiencing any self emotion. ‘Throw out all the dead! All the cadavers outside! ’…‘Here’s one! Take him! ’ they undressed him. the subsisters avidly sharing out his apparels. so to ‘gravediggers’ took him. one by the caput and one by the pess. and threw him out the waggon like a poke of flour” ( Wiesel 94 ) . This shows dehumanisation because they were able to dispose of their ain chap people and experience no sense of compunction or hurting towards their inhumanely actions. “Meir. Meir. my male child! Don’t you acknowledge me?

I’m you father…you’re aching me…you’re killing male parent! I’ve got some bread…for you too…for you too… . ” ( Wiesel 96 ) . The quotation mark explains how even a boy would turn against his ain male parent for a spot of staff of life to nosh on turn outing merely how dehumanizingly barbarian and cruel the Jews were towards one another. The Jews dehumanized themselves every bit good as each other by turning against their ain household and people without experiencing any sense of compunction or sorrow. . Wiesel’s fresh Night clearly displays the dehumanisation of Eliezer. his household. and his fellow Jews. Wiesel explains the procedure exhaustively from the start of the novel to the terminal where Eliezer eventually sees how he himself had become dehumanized. It reveals the rough interventions given by the Germans and the want of the Jews worth as being in any manner humane. The novel besides provides the disclosure of the the effects due to the barbarous and dehumanising behaviour that the Jews inflicted on one another that was inherited during the clip spent in the concentration cantonments. Elie Wiesel expresses how the Germans had no regard for his people every bit good as the treating and thought of the Jews as objects or animate beings. Elie Wiesel’s fresh Night gives us an inside expression of the dehumanisation that was being placed upon the Judaic people because of the influence of the Nazis.

UOP FIN 200 WEEK 8 CHECKPOINT TIME VALUE OF MONEY

FIN 200 WEEK 8 CHECKPOINT TIME VALUE OF MONEY
CheckPoint: Time Value of Money
· Resource: Ch. 7 of Foundations of Financial Management
· Write a 200- to 300-word description of the four time value of money concepts: present value, present value of an annuity, future value, and future value of annuity. Describe the characteristics of each concept and give an example of when each would be used.
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 ?FIN 200 WEEK 8 CHECKPOINT TIME VALUE OF MONEY
CheckPoint: Time Value of Money
· Resource: Ch. 7 of Foundations of Financial Management
· Write a 200- to 300-word description of the four time value of money concepts: present value, present value of an annuity, future value, and future value of annuity. Describe the characteristics of each concept and give an example of when each would be used.
To purchase this material click below link
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?FIN 200 WEEK 8 CHECKPOINT TIME VALUE OF MONEY
CheckPoint: Time Value of Money
· Resource: Ch. 7 of Foundations of Financial Management
· Write a 200- to 300-word description of the four time value of money concepts: present value, present value of an annuity, future value, and future value of annuity. Describe the characteristics of each concept and give an example of when each would be used.
To purchase this material click below link
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?FIN 200 WEEK 8 CHECKPOINT TIME VALUE OF MONEY
CheckPoint: Time Value of Money
· Resource: Ch. 7 of Foundations of Financial Management
· Write a 200- to 300-word description of the four time value of money concepts:…

UOP FIN 200 Week 8 DQ 1 And DQ 2

FIN 200 Week 8 DQ 1 And DQ 2
Week 8 DQ 1
Review the Time Value of Money simulation. Which option did you initially choose, cash or annuity? How were your winnings affected by the cash option? How did this compare to the annuity option? If you won the lottery today, which option would you choose and whyWeek 8 DQ 2
Jean will receive $8,500 per year for the next 15 years from her trust. If a 7% interest rate is applied, what is the current value of the future payments? Describe how you solved this problem, including which table (for example, present value and future value) was used and why.
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 ?FIN 200 Week 8 DQ 1 And DQ 2
Week 8 DQ 1
Review the Time Value of Money simulation. Which option did you initially choose, cash or annuity? How were your winnings affected by the cash option? How did this compare to the annuity option? If you won the lottery today, which option would you choose and whyWeek 8 DQ 2
Jean will receive $8,500 per year for the next 15 years from her trust. If a 7% interest rate is applied, what is the current value of the future payments? Describe how you solved this problem, including which table (for example, present value and future value) was used and why.
To purchase this material click below link
http://www.assignmentcloud.com/FIN-200/FIN-200-Week-8-DQ-1-And-DQ-2For more classes visit
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?FIN 200 Week 8 DQ 1 And DQ 2
Week 8 DQ 1
Review the Time Value of Money simulation. Which option did you initially choose, cash or annuity? How were your winnings affected by the cash option? How did this compare to the annuity option? If you won the lottery today, which option would you choose and whyWeek 8 DQ 2
Jean will receive $8,500 per year for the next 15 years from her trust. If a 7% interest rate is applied, what is the current…

Development of India Essay Sample

Throughout history belief systems every bit good as systems of regulating have grown from one another and besides built from the others thoughts. In many cases civilisation. authorities and faith have become one. they both play off the other. In the age of Hammurabi between 1792 and 1730 BCE a codification of Torahs was constructed for all to see by hex the criterions of Babylon were set. ( Andrea. 13 ) The Judaic people besides had a criterion by which they lived and it was called the Torah. In this were set guidelines to demo the ways that they should populate. The Torah was created around 1000 BCE and is still a immense factor in the Judaic life style today. ( Andrea. 52 ) Both of these codifications or guidelines were shaped by people before them and both shaped the civilisations that were to follow them. These historical texts both discuss the constructs of “an oculus for an oculus. tooth for a tooth” . every bit good as bondage and how it played a portion in each civilisation. It is really interesting to see how the texts comparison in their expression on both of these rough subjects.

In line 196 of the codification of Hammurabi it is clearly stated. “If a adult male put out the oculus of another may. his oculus shall be put out. ” ( Historywiz ) This may look to be a rough penalty when compared to the criterions of judicial systems today. but in this clip of a short lived united Mesopotamia this is what Hammurabi believed would be able to maintain his land a united forepart. This codification was carved on a monumental rock for all to see. In making this. the full population would be able to cognize for certain what is expected of them and what the penalties would be if these codifications were broken. We besides see this same construct stated in the Jewish Torah which came into being about 700 old ages subsequently so the codification of Hammurabi.

From the book of Exodus. chapter 21 line 23. “But if any injury follow. 1000 shalt give life for life. Eye for Eye. tooth for tooth. manus for manus. pes for pes. Burning for firing. lesion for lesion. band for band. ” ( mechon-mamre ) This extract is saying the same construct about indistinguishable to that of Babylon’s Hammurabi. It is besides placed in full public position because of the fact that it is the cardinal point of the Judaic life style. When comparing these two texts it would look that the Judaic Torah has built from the Hammurabi’s codification and elaborated it into parts of their spiritual instructions and their manner of life.

In the Torah. from the book of Exodus. we see a good illustration of the early Judaic positions on bondage. “If a adult male strikes his male or female slave with a rod. and the slave dies under his manus. the decease must be avenged. However. if the slave survives for a twenty-four hours or two. his decease shall non be avenged. since he is his master’s belongings. ” ( ravkooktorah ) Obviously this shows that bondage was something that was mundane life and that slaves were clearly belongings of their maestro. This same thought is stated in Hammurabi’s codification. In Babylon slaves were clearly looked on as belongings and belonging to a maestro. In many separate lines where offenses can be committed against free adult male or break one’s back the debt to be paid for harming a slave is drastically less than that of a free adult male. Yet. even though slaves were considered simply belongings. they at least were shown a little more respect in Babylon sense they were still deserving plenty to be able to pull some value from their losingss.

The Judaic Torah seems to hold built from the thoughts that were stated more than 700 old ages before by Hammurabi in Babylon. The Jews took a codification of Torahs and expanded on them to organize important points in their political orientation. This was besides passed on to the Christians old ages subsequently and would organize into their belief systems as good and besides to other governmental and spiritual groups. organisations. and civilisations that still exist to this twenty-four hours.

Bibliography

“Exodus Chapter 21. ” Exodus 21 / Hebrew Bible in English / Mechon-Mamre. Accessed September 8. 2014.

“Code of Hammurabi Text – HistoryWiz Primary Source. ” Code of Hammurabi Text – HistoryWiz Primary Source. Accessed September 9. 2014.

“Rav Kook on Mishpatim: Bondage in the Torah. ” Rav Kook on Mishpatim: Bondage in the Torah. Accessed September 10. 2014.

Andrea. Alfred J. . and James H. Overfield. The Human Record: Beginnings of Global History. 6th erectile dysfunction. Boston: Houghton Mifflin. 2009.

BSHS 401 UOP Courses Tutorials/ Uoptutorial

BSHS 401 ENTIRE COURSEFor more course tutorials visit
www.uoptutorial.com
BSHS 401 Week 1 Individual Assignment Journal Entry One
BSHS 401 Week 1 Individual Assignment Case Management Brochure
BSHS 401 Week 1 Discussion Question 1
BSHS 401 Week 1 Discussion Question 2
BSHS 401 Week 2 Individual Assignment Journal Entry Two
BSHS 401 Week 2 Individual Assignment Assessments Package
BSHS 401 Week 2 Discussion Question 1
BSHS 401 Week 2 Discussion Question 2
BSHS 401 Week 3 Individual Assignment Journal Entry Three
BSHS 401 Week 3 Discussion Question 1
BSHS 401 Week 3 Discussion Question 2
BSHS 401 Week 4 Individual Assignment Journal Entry Four
BSHS 401 Week 4 Individual Assignment Case Study File
BSHS 401 Week 4 Discussion Question 1
BSHS 401 Week 4 Discussion Question 2
BSHS 401 Week 5 Individual Assignment Journal Entry Five
BSHS 401 Week 5 Team Assignment Case Management Interview Presentations
BSHS 401 Week 5 Discussion Question 1
BSHS 401 Week 5 Discussion Question 2——————————————————————–BSHS 401 Week 1 Discussion Question 1For more course tutorials visit
www.uoptutorial.com
Describe various types of case managers—social work, nursing, psychology, and so forth—and the tasks performed by each..
———————————————————————-BSHS 401 Week 1 Discussion Question 2For more course tutorials visit
www.uoptutorial.com
Compare client-driven goals and provider-given goals.—————————————————————————-BSHS 401 Week 1 Individual Assignment Case Management BrochureFor more course tutorials visit
www.uoptutorial.com
Resource: Case Management Brochure Builder located on your student web page.Create a Case Management Brochure that includes the following:• Brief history of case management
• Different roles and responsibilities of case managers
• Four…

ART 100 UOP Courses / uoptutorial

ART 100 Entire Course (2 Sets)For more course tutorials visit
www.uoptutorial.com This tutorial contains 2 Papers for each Assignment, Check Details below
ART 100 Week 1 Individual Assignment Experience the Art (2 Papers)
ART 100 Week 1 concept
ART 100 Week 2 concept
ART 100 Week 2 Individual Assignment How the Visual Arts Communicate (Option A Paper)
ART 100 Week 2 Individual Assignment How the Visual Arts Communicate (Option B Paper)
ART 100 Week 3 Individual Assignment The performing Art and Inspiration (2 Papers)
ART 100 Week 4 Individual Assignment Symbolism in Theater and Cinema (2 Papers)
ART 100 Week 5 Individual Assignment Defending the Arts (2 PPT)
ART 100 Week 5 Concept—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–ART 100 Week 1 Individual Assignment Experience the Art (2 Papers) For more course tutorials visit
www.uoptutorial.com This tutorial contains 2 different Papers
Describe two or three personal experiences of the arts for your Week One assignment that includes the following:
Your definition of the arts
A description of what each experience communicated to you—how it made you feel or what it made you think of
Note. Your experiences of the arts may include attending concerts or plays, art in your home or a museum, a movie, or your own work as an artist or performer. If you are describing your own artwork, discuss how the process of creating or performing affected you and what you wished to communicate.
Submit your assignment in one of the following formats:
A 250- to 500-word paper
A 3- to 7-minute podcast or video—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————ART 100 Week 5 Individual Assignment Defending the Arts (2 PPT) For…

Legal Issues for Managers Essay Sample

Issue
1. Is Patricia an Officer of Stadium Enterprises Pty Ltd ( SEPL ) ?
2. Has Patricia breached her responsibility to move with due attention and diligence?
3. Has Patricia breached her responsibility to move in good religion in the best involvements of SEPL?
4. Did Patricia improperly use information to derive an advantage. doing hurt to SEPL?
5. Has Patricia acted recklessly. venally. and failed to exert and dispatch her responsibilities for a proper intent and in the best involvements of SEPL?
6. Did Patricia engage in insider trading?
7. Is Dan an Officer of Fancy Pants Pty Ltd ( FPPL ) ?
8. Did Dan hold a responsibility to forestall insolvent trading?







Law
1. Section 9 Corporations Act 2001 ( Cth ) ( CA ) – definition of Officer
2. Section 180 CA – due attention and diligence
3. Section 183 CA – usage of information
4. Section 184 CA – responsibility to move in good religion. usage of place and usage of information
5. Section 1043 CA – insider trading ( all individuals. non merely managers ) 6. Section 588G CA – responsibility to forestall insolvent trading




Daniels V AWA Ltd ( 1995 ) 37 NSWLR 438
Application
1. Section 9 defines an Officer to include a Director of a company. ( slides ) We are told Patricia is a Director of SEPL so she will be an Officer within the Corporations Law. 2. Section 180 requires that an Officer must exert their powers and dispatch their responsibilities with the grade of attention and diligence that a sensible individual would. ( slides ) Patricia and Dan did non move in a manner that a sensible individual would because they failed to do good determinations that deal with the fiscal and concern personal businesss of SEPL. therefore it is likely they have breached subdivision 180. Daniels 5 AWA Ltd ( 1995 ) 37 NSWLR 438: The CEO breached his responsibility of attention and diligence because he did non exercising due attention and accomplishment to cover determinations covering with the fiscal position and concern personal businesss of the company. ( fact ) 3. Section183 states a individual who obtains information because they are. or have been. a Director of a corporation must non improperly utilize the information to derive an advantage for themselves or person else ; or do hurt to the corporation. ( slides )

Patricia caused SEPL to pay $ 1. 000. 000 more for its coup d’etat command than originally anticipated because the portion monetary value of FPPL doubled. Hence. it is likely Patricia has breached subdivision 183. ASIC v Vizard [ 2005 ] FCA 1037: The CEO of Telstra provided the Directors with confidential information about ASX listed companies. so the best investing determinations could be made for Telstra. Vizard. a Director of Telstra. used this information to purchase portions in those companies before Telstra did and therefore made money. Vizard was held to hold breached subdivision 183. ( fact ) 4. Section 184 requires that Officers will be apt to a condemnable offense if they contravene a civil punishment proviso. recklessly or venally. and neglect to dispatch their responsibilities in good religion in the best involvement of the corporation. or for a proper intent.

As Patricia has contravened subdivisions 180 and 183. so it is expected she has breached subdivision 184. Adler V ASIC ( 2002 ) 42 ACSR 80: Santow J. ordered Adler be disqualified from pull offing a company for 20 old ages. imposed a monetary punishment on him of $ 450. 000. and ordered him to pay compensation of $ 7. 958. 112 to HIH Insurance. On entreaty to the NSW Court of Appeal. these orders were upheld. ( fact ) 5. Section 1043 prohibits insider trading by any individual to cover with portions or to utilize. or prosecute with others to cover in. price-sensitive information of a public company before the information is readily available to the populace. Patricia provided information to her sister Faye about SEPL’s purpose to do a coup d’etat command to FPPL. and Patricia directed Faye to purchase portions in FPPL while they were cheap so she could do some money. As a consequence. her sister Faye purchased a big sum of portions in FPPL and she made $ 250. 000 net income.

Consequently. it is likely Patricia will be found to hold violated subdivision 1043. R 5 Rivkin [ 2004 ] NSWCCA 7: Mason P Wood CJ at CL and Sully J. ordered the high profile Sydney stockbroker Rene Rivkin. be prosecuted for the insider trading of Qantas portions. hence sentenced him to imprisonment for a term of 9 months to be served by manner of periodic detainment. and fined him in the amount of $ 30. 000. ( fact ) 6. Section 9 defines an Officer to include a Director of a company. ( slides ) We are told Dan is a Director of FPPL so he will be an Officer within the Corporations Law. 7. Section 588G prescribes that an Officer has a responsibility to forestall insolvent trading by a company. They should non let the company to go insolvent by incurring debts. or incur a debt while it is insolvent. Dan used FPPL’s recognition to buy a $ 300. 000 machine even though he knew FPPL was unable to pay company’s measures. which illustrates that Dan traded whilst FPPL was in an insolvent place. Thus. Dan is likely to hold breached subdivision 588G. R V Hannes ( 2002 ) 173 FLR 1. Hannes bought TNT options and realised a net income of $ 2million when a coup d’etat of TNT was announced during their currency. He was sentence to imprisonment for two old ages and two months and fined $ 100. 000. ( fact ) Decision

On the balance of chances. Patricia and Dan will be found to hold breached the undermentioned subdivisions of the CA: 1. Patricia and Dan – Section 180 for non utilizing attention and diligence ; 2. Patricia – Section 183 by improperly utilizing information ; 3. Patricia and Dan – Section 184 for neglecting to dispatch their responsibilities in good religion in the best involvement of the corporation. or for a proper intent ; and 4. Patricia – Section 1043 for prosecuting in insider trading with others. Redresss

The civil redresss are:
1. Section 1317J – Patricia and Dan ordered to each wage a monetary punishment of $ 50. 000 to the Commonwealth ; 2. Section 1317H – Patricia ordered to pay compensation of $ 1. 000. 000 to SEPL ; 3. Section 206C – Patricia and Dan each disqualified from Directorships for a period of 10 old ages ; and 4. Section 233 – weaving up of FPPL.

Under subdivision 1317E. the condemnable redresss are $ 200. 000 and/or 5 old ages in prison for Patricia and Dan.

UOP FIN 200 WEEK 9 CAPSTONE CHECKPOINT

FIN 200 WEEK 9 CAPSTONE CHECKPOINT
Capstone CheckPoint: Present Value, Future Value, and Annuity Due
· Resource: Ch. 9 of Foundations of Financial Management
· Complete Problems 3, 4, and 5 on pp. 278-279.
· Post as an attachment.
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 ?FIN 200 WEEK 9 CAPSTONE CHECKPOINT
Capstone CheckPoint: Present Value, Future Value, and Annuity Due
· Resource: Ch. 9 of Foundations of Financial Management
· Complete Problems 3, 4, and 5 on pp. 278-279.
· Post as an attachment.
To purchase this material click below link
http://www.assignmentcloud.com/FIN-200/FIN-200-WEEK-9-CAPSTONE-CHECKPOINTFor more classes visit
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?FIN 200 WEEK 9 CAPSTONE CHECKPOINT
Capstone CheckPoint: Present Value, Future Value, and Annuity Due
· Resource: Ch. 9 of Foundations of Financial Management
· Complete Problems 3, 4, and 5 on pp. 278-279.
· Post as an attachment.
To purchase this material click below link
http://www.assignmentcloud.com/FIN-200/FIN-200-WEEK-9-CAPSTONE-CHECKPOINTFor more classes visit
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?FIN 200 WEEK 9 CAPSTONE CHECKPOINT
Capstone CheckPoint: Present Value, Future Value, and Annuity Due
· Resource: Ch. 9 of Foundations of Financial Management
· Complete Problems 3, 4, and 5 on pp. 278-279.
· Post as an attachment.
To purchase this material click below link
http://www.assignmentcloud.com/FIN-200/FIN-200-WEEK-9-CAPSTONE-CHECKPOINTFor more classes visit
www.assignmentcloud.com

?FIN 200 WEEK 9 CAPSTONE CHECKPOINT
Capstone CheckPoint: Present Value, Future Value, and Annuity Due
· Resource: Ch. 9 of Foundations of Financial Management
· Complete Problems 3, 4, and 5 on pp. 278-279.
· Post as an attachment.
To purchase this material click below link…

ART 101 UOP Course Tutorial/ShopTutorial

ART 101 Entire CourseFor more course tutorials visit
www.shoptutorial.comART 101 Week 1 CheckPoint Visual Literacy
ART 101 Week 1 Assignment Reading Art Practicing Iconography
ART 101 Week 2 CheckPoint Art and Intention
ART 101 Week 2 DQ 1 and DQ 2
ART 101 Week 3 CheckPoint Analytical and Expressive Line
ART 101 Week 3 Assignment Formal Analysis of Art
ART 101 Week 4 CheckPoint Design Movements
ART 101 Week 4 DQ 1 and DQ 2
ART 101 Week 5 CheckPoint Drawing
ART 101 Week 5 Assignment Painting Styles
ART 101 Week 6 CheckPoint Film and Popular Cinema
ART 101 Week 6 DQ 1 and DQ 2
ART 101 Week 7 CheckPoint Greek and Roman Architecture
ART 101 Week 7 Assignment Architecture and Function
ART 101 Week 8 CheckPoint Sculpture Mediums and Process
ART 101 Week 8 DQ 1 and DQ 2
ART 101 Week 9 Capstone CheckPoint
ART 101 Week 9 Final Project Art Timeline************************************************************************************************************ART 101 Week 1 Assignment Reading Art PracticingFor more course tutorials visit
www.shoptutorial.comAssignment: “Reading” Art: Practicing Iconography
Iconography is the practice of understanding symbolism in art and is one aspect of visual
literacy. Understanding visual literacy and roles of the artist deepens one’s appreciation of art. The Week One assignment reinforces concepts presented in Ch. 1 and 2 regarding artists’ roles and understanding art.
Review Ch. 1 & 2 of A World of Art.
Review the multimedia: “Reading” Art: Practicing Iconography:
http://corptrain.phoenix.edu/sites/art101/index.html
Choose two works of art that embody at least one role of the artist. Make sure one work holds symbolic significance requiring the application of iconography. Refer to Appendix B and your Discovering Art 2.0 CD-ROM for artwork. In addition, you may use other sources in your search for examples of artwork.
Write a 300- to 350-word essay in APA format summarizing the roles of the…

BP Amoco Case Essay Sample

1. In a defined-contribution ( DC ) pension program. the employee or employer. or both. make regular parts to the program. In the US. employees typically set aside a preset per centum of their net incomes which is deposited to the program and the employer will fit that part. Ultimately. the sum of money available to the single upon retirement is determined by the public presentation of their investings. Each employee retains the option to take how to diversify their investings. while the employer will typically supply a “default allocation” option. The options available are by and large really varied. and includes a figure of index financess and actively managed common financess. In a defined-benefit ( DB ) pension program. the retired person is paid a fixed sum per month upon retirement. That sum is calculated based on a expression that takes into history the employee’s past net incomes. age and term of office. In this system. the employer assumes the hazard while employee bear no hazard. Funding comes from both employees and employers. and the fund can be managed internally or by an external fund director. or a combination of both. 2. Amoco offered index-oriented investing options to its employees

. These investings. known as nucleus investing options. were designed for Amoco employees and managed by professionals in a day-to-day and inactive manner. This index financess had lower direction costs. The mean disbursal ratio for the indexed financess in the Amoco program was 10 footing points. In add-on. Amoco offered its employees externally managed index financess for US equities. long-run bonds. and US money market instruments. Amoco besides offered a balanced indexed fund that assorted these three domestic plus groups plus international equities in a diversified portfolio. US Savings Bonds were offered to Amoco employees every bit good. State Street Bank provided the legal guardian and record maintaining services. In the old ages before the amalgamation. Amoco included an international equity index fund. a mid-capitalization index fund. and a small-capitalisation equity index fund. Another program was offered that purely invested in the company’s stock. To cut down securities firm fees. this fund aggregated all investing activity by program participants on a day-to-day footing. fiting purchasing and merchandising activity.

Participants could merchandise the company stock fund on any concern twenty-four hours. but limited to merely twice a month. In 1998. Amoco DC program assets were valued at $ 5. 1 billion. 55. 5 % of the assets were invested in company stock. The remainder of the assets were invested in equity index financess and the money market fund. The program had 27. 290 participants with an norm of $ 186. 000 per participant. and parts of about $ 4. 182 per twelvemonth from each one of them. The company matched parts up to 7 % of wage. BP America had a different defined part program. The company offered employees the chance to purchase portions of company stock. put in a stable income fund managed internally and seven public common financess. The common financess included three active financess on US equities. one active fund on international equities. two active balanced financess that invested on bonds and stocks. and one index fund. Plan assets were valued at $ 2 billion. and the program had 12. 892 participants. doing it smaller to Amoco’s.

In contrast to Amoco’s program. merely 16 % of the assets were invested in company stock. and 51 % of the assets were invested in the stable income fund. The remainder of the assets were invested largely in one of the equity financess. Each participant on norm had assets of $ 156. 800 in the program. and made one-year parts of about $ 2. 824. The company matched this part with about $ 1. 400 a twelvemonth. Just before unifying. BP had approved a program to widen the figure of investing options utilizing fidelity investings as legal guardian and record keeper. This made more than 150 common financess available to the participants. 3. We recommend that BP Amoco offers a combination of index financess. common financess. and company stocks to their employees. The cost of these different investing options should follow the price-discrimination attack and the company should cover merely the cost of nucleus investing financess. go forthing the cost of common financess to be covered by the program participants.

We have decided to offer several index financess because they are low-priced and good diversified. intending that they carry low hazard. In add-on. common financess should be included because they simplify the meeting of BP America’s and Amoco’s pension programs. Even though common financess have a higher cost and carry with them an addition in liability for BP Amoco. non including common financess would intend liquidating or stop deading bing investings in common financess for BP America’s employees. The common financess offered should be evaluated based non merely on the alpha. but besides on the Sharpe Ratio. It is of import to include the Sharpe Ratio in our analysis because it tells us whether the high returns merely came as a consequence of higher hazard. or if they were the consequence of smart investing determinations made by common fund directors. Although puting in company stock would intend that participants would hold to bear all the hazard. BP Amoco should offer company stock to its employees for several grounds. The first being that when puting in the company’s stock. securities firm fees are reduced significantly. The 2nd ground is that employees can put in their DC program utilizing their pre-tax income.

Another ground to include company stocks is that when BP Amoco matches the participant’s parts to their program. they can utilize company stock to make it. This manner. fiting doesn’t cost the house hard currency and doesn’t cut down the company’s net incomes. Finally. offering company stock is a manner to fit employees’ public presentation to the overall ends of the company. 4. We would urge different default allotment schemes for participants depending on their age. Because many employees hold on to the default allotment and do non do alterations. the program allotment should set over clip automatically. otherwise the allotment will of course set over clip and stocks will do up excessively much of the portfolio in ulterior old ages. When participants are immature. it is recommended that they invest a higher per centum of their parts in stocks ( high hazard. high return ) and a lower per centum in hard currency equivalents ( low hazard. low returns ) .

When an employee is in his or her mid-twentiess. the default allotment recommended would be 10 % hard currency. 40 % bonds. 20 % stocks. and 30 % international stocks. This allotment has a higher return with higher hazard. which is ideal for immature investors since retirement is many old ages off. Middle-age employees should equilibrate their short- and long-run ends at the clip of apportioning their investings. For illustration. parents should hold adequate liquidness to cover their children’s instruction costs on clip. By the clip the employee reaches the age of 50. the allotment should be adjusted to hold a higher per centum in bonds than stocks. doing the DC pension program much less volatile and hazardous during the last decennary of employment. If liability hazard considerations were non at drama. default allotment would be higher for stocks and lower for bonds.

If BP Amoco has no liabilities risk when its employees invest their pensions in stock markets. so it is optimum that the allotment favours stock markets when employees are immature so that they can acquire higher returns. In this instance. we would put default allotments at 10 % hard currency. 20 % bonds. 30 % stocks. and 40 % international stocks. Because 401k parts are capped at $ 15. 500. many employees will salvage outside the 401k. They should apportion their investings depending on the revenue enhancement rate of a specific plus. Long-run stocks are nonexempt merely when they are sold. This means that revenue enhancement is deferred until you sell a stock. giving you the possibility to cover your revenue enhancements with your capital additions. To suit these employees. the program should be adjusted to include largely stocks in order to postpone revenue enhancements on capital additions until retirement. Outside of the program. employees could so put in long-run assets and neutralize them upon retirement. By following this program. employees that will put outside of the 401k will be able to minimise revenue enhancements on capital additions by postponing them until retirement. when they will be in a lower income revenue enhancement bracket.